What is the Best Material for Dental Crowns?

There are times when your teeth weaken or become vulnerable due to a fracture. With an endodontic treatment or a great fix, your dentist can restore your appearance and function with a dental crown. The dental crown is a cover that covers the entire surface of the tooth, and provides extra protection against wear or breakage. 

There are many materials to manufacture these crowns, and each of them has its advantages and disadvantages, which is why each patient should study with their dentist the different options, and find the most suitable for their particular unique situation.

What Are Common Materials for Dental Crowns?

While there exist a variety of options, some of the most common materials that are commonly used for dental crowns include the following:

Porcelain and Ceramic Crowns

Porcelain and Ceramic Crowns are widely used since they perfectly mimic the natural appearance of the teeth. The improvement in materials is making them increasingly durable!

Crowns of Composite Resins

Composite Resin crowns are considerably cheaper than other alternatives, but have a certain degree of possibility of fracturing, so they are not as durable as those built with ceramics. Usually this material is used for the construction of temporary crowns, while the final one is made. 

Metal Crowns

Metal crowns can be broken down into the following:

  • Platinum/Nickel Crowns: These crowns are strong but unsightly and are reserved for teeth that are in the back of the mouth, which are therefore not very visible. 

  • Gold Crowns:  These crowns offer excellent durability and require less modification of natural teeth. It does not break and does not cause wear on the opposite tooth. The aesthetic aspect is debatable. 

  • Stainless Crowns: These crowns are typically used in very damaged milk teeth. They are only used in the first temporary molars of children, and in some cases, in temporary incisors. 

Zirconium Crowns

These crowns offer great resistance to fractures and masticatory forces in addition to being highly aesthetic, the result of their placement offers a very natural appearance, like one more tooth, being able to use it to restore front teeth and molars, achieving the same tone as that of the dental pieces that surround it.

Crowns Made from Combined Materials

The most common combination for dental crown materials is that of metal and porcelain. In this type of crowns the strength and durability of the metal (on the inside of the crown), and the most natural aesthetics of porcelain (on the outside of the piece) are used.

How Should I Decide Which Material To Use for Dental Crowns?

To choose the most suitable material for each situation, the following must be taken into account:

  1. Patient related factors. A very important point to consider is the information related to allergies that the patient may suffer. For example, for people allergic to heavy metals, materials such as porcelain or zirconium should be chosen.

  2. Purchasing power of the patient, which can generally influence the type of material he prefers for treatment. Ceramic crowns are more economically accessible, for example, if we compare them with those of zirconium, and their appearance is quite natural, although their durability is less.

  3. Function of the dental piece to be restored, for the masticatory function, such as molars and premolars, it is advisable to use resistant materials such as metals or combinations. For frontal or visible teeth, materials with greater aesthetics are recommended (mainly because they can match the tone of the rest of the dental pieces) such as porcelain or zirconium.

Contact Riverwalk Dental Group in Boynton Beach, Jupiter, Boynton, or Port St. Lucie, FL

If you have any additional questions or would like to schedule a consultation to see if dental crowns are right for you,  please contact Riverwalk Dental Group today! We offer four convenient locations in Jupiter, Boynton Beach, Stuart, & Port St. Lucie, FL!

Share this post

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email

Schedule Free Consultation